Discussion Forums at Tactical Neuronics


Re: Re: math variables lenght From:
Robert Jessop

Long integer is 32 bits so you could do it if you used all the ~v variables and some of the team ~h variables. The problem would be accessing them quickly as they are separate and can't be used as an array as far as I know.

you be able to use a variable to store the current column like this?:

assign v1 vr
cmath va = (some maths) * ~~v1

The compiler seems to replace ~ expressions with their contents before evaluating commands so ~v1 is replaced with vr leaving ~vr. I don't know if the compiler would then see the ~vr or miss it?


> Davide,
>
> There is no set length limit to the storage size of a variable in A.I. Wars (other than your PC's memory), but there is a computational limit to a 'long integer' in math calculations. It may be possible using more than one variable.
>
> Most Cybug programmers don't attempt mapping the arena since the time it takes to calculate and use this data leaves the Cybug open to attack before it can make meaningful use out of the data. In some cases they do check a few points on the map with the GPS Scan to detect which common map may be in use and then run preprogrammed paths to get to their favorite defensive position. On the other hand, if the Cybug you are writing is for a specific challenge like solving a maze, then I can see why you're interested.
>
> Good luck!
> John
>
> > hi all
> > i just downloaded this COOL game
> > i would like to implement memory in my bug
> > using a single variable
> > that keeps my bug's perceptions
> >
> > its a bit difficult to explain...
> > (if u are interested i'll try)
> >
> > i would like to know the limit of the variables
> >
> > what is the maximum number i can assign to a variable?
> >
> > in my project i need a number with 43x30 decimal positions
> > (each decimal position is a cell in my bug's memry)
> >
> > i'd like to know if i can
> >
> >

This message is a Reply to: Re: math variables lenght from John Reder

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